The world is a wonderful, if very wacky, place to be.

Snow Day

Today it snowed, and snowed, and snowed.

Seoul is a very crowded city, and Sunday is everyone’s day off, so we stayed in until night fall.

The kids loved the snow. They threw snowballs at each other. Aquila didn’t always bother with a snowball, but would just pick up an armful of snow and throw it up in the air in a celebration of winter as she’s never seen it before.

Volucris built a fort, just like he’s dreamed of for years:

All that Calvin and Hobbes put ideas in his head.

The streets had been cleared by the time we got out, but they sought out the snow and they all enjoyed running through the snow, breathing in the cold, new air and listening to the crunching sound under their boots.

And then we got on the bus to Costco.
Which brings us on the subject of Kosher food in Korea. Considering how many Jews there are in Korea (estimated to be the 200 range, including all six of us), it’s amazing how much kosher food there is. There are imports. There is the Chabad House. And there is Costco.

On the other hand… there isn’t that much kosher food in Korea. Fruits and vegetables in winter are outrageously expensive (remind me to take you food shopping with me. You’ll be stunned). And of course you can get any grain, as long as it’s rice. Which is why I thought that buying an industrial size box of frozen Kirkland white flour waffles was a good idea. We don’t eat like this at home. Ever.

But we don’t play like this, either.

Duck.

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